Research Findings

Video on statins, diabetes and women

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A recent video commentary offers an interesting and provocative take on the issue of women and statins.

In this commentary, Dr. Michael Eades discusses the videotaped remarks of Dr. JoAnn Manson at Harvard Medical School as she talks about the Women’s Health Initiative study as it relates to women on cholesterol-lowering statin drugs.

Dr. Eades asks why – despite the recent evidence of an association between statins and diabetes in women, and evidence that statins provide no health benefits to women – Dr. Manson argues that this is not a reason to stop prescribing statins to women.

See the commentary on YouTube.

Read a recent letter about statins, in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Statins for primary prevention.

Read more the issues of safety and efficacy of statins for women, in Evidence for Caution: Women and Statin Use, by Harriet Rosenberg and Danielle Allard for Women and Health Protection.

How useful are those drugs for urinary incontinence?

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A recent review published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that drugs for urgency urinary incontinence show “small benefit”.

Read the systematic review here: Systematic Review: Benefits and Harms of Pharmacologic Treatment for Urinary Incontinence in Women

What you always wanted to know about breast screening

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What are the benefits and harms of attending a screening programme for breast cancer?

How many will benefit from being screened, and how many will be harmed?

What is the scientific evidence for this?

For the latest information on the evidence on mammography by The Nordic Cochrane Centre 2012, read more and download the brochure.

The role of social support in reducing psychological distress

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A new Analysis in Brief titled The Role of Social Support in Reducing Psychological Distress has been released by the Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

This study demonstrates that social support is an important factor in promoting the transition from high levels to lower levels of distress two years later; it also shows that the significant supports are different for men and women. For women, regular opportunities to interact and talk with people showed a reduction in distress, whereas for men, being married was connected to improvements in levels of distress.

Click here to download this Analysis in Brief.

For more information about this product, please contact Lisa Corscadden at : lcorscadden@cihi.ca.

Pap smears boost cervical cancer survival

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Read on CBC about a new study about the effectiveness of Pap smear screening for dramatically improving for cervical cancer survival. The study by Swedish researchers found that the survival rate was 92 per cent among women whose had aggressive cervical cancer that was detected with the screening. This was compared with 66 per cent for those who were diagnosed when they showed symptoms and the cancer was hard to treat.

The study was published this March in the British Medical Journal.

Read the story on CBC

New publication from the Centres!

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The British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, in partnership with the Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence and the Atlantic Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, has just released a new publication:

Careful Measures: An Exploration of the Sex and Gender Dimensions of a Deprivation Index
M. J. Haworth-Brockman, H. Isfeld, A. Pederson, B. Clow, A. Liwander, and B. A. Kinniburgh, Editors

The report is available on BCCEWH’s website

Report: Youth and unsafe abortion - A global snapshot

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Young people ages 10-24 account for 27 percent of the world’s population totaling at 1.7 billion. Worldwide, approximately 16 million women and girls ages 15 to 19 give birth each year, accounting for approximately 11 percent of all births worldwide. For these young women, complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death, and unsafe abortion is a major contributor to this mortality. Unsafe abortion can also result in lasting and devastating consequences, including, sepsis, perforation of the uterus or intestines, hemorrhage, chronic pelvic infection, and infertility.

Read the full report by Advocates for Youth.

Women’s health is tied to wealth

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According to a recent story on the Positive Living Society of British Columbia website, a new report on the status of women's health in the province shows that women have gained an additional 3.2 years of life expectancy since 1990, but there are significant disparities based on income.

Said Dr. Perry Kendall, B.C.'s provincial health officer, "If you are in the top 20 per cent of income, you have 9.5 more years of healthy life expectancy."

The report looks at the overall health of women from infancy to old age, based on data collected in 2008. Women's health is improving over-all, with advances in life expectancy and decreases in teen pregnancy, but low-income, aboriginal and immigrant women fare much worse.

Read the story on Positive Living Society of BC’s website

 

UN issues first report on human rights of gay and lesbian people

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The first ever United Nations report on the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people details how around the world people are killed or endure hate-motivated violence, torture, detention, criminalization and discrimination in jobs, health care and education because of their real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Read more.

The baby boom effect: Caring for Canada's aging population

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The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) recently released their report Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging

The report discusses how, as the baby boom generation begins to turn 65 this year, the aging of Canada's population will accelerate, and the health care system will need to adapt to meet the future needs of a growing senior population. The report shows that, while Canada's seniors (age 65 and older) are living longer and are healthier than ever, they are frequent users of the health system, costing more than any other segment of the population. Representing just 14% of the population, seniors use 40% of hospital services in Canada and account for about 45% of all provincial and territorial government health spending.

The differences between women and men are striking. As the report notes, "Most seniors are women, especially among the older age groups. For example, women accounted for 52% of seniors age 65 to 74 and 60% of seniors age 75 and older in 2010. Women will continue to outnumber men into the future; however, this gender split will become more even as the age gap in life expectancy narrows for men and women."

Download Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging

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