Resources

Designer Genitalia: Podcast on Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery

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Nip and tuck surgeries have become commonplace, but what about cosmetic genital surgeries?  A quick search reveals six clinics in Toronto alone that offer to reduce women’s labia, tighten their vaginas or remove their clitoral hood.  Surprised?  In the U.K., last year these procedures on the National Health Service increased by 70% on the previous year to 1,118.  If you are curious, intrigued or just plain flabbergasted, listen to our podcast with Leonore Tiefer and Lyba Spring with CWHN Executive Director, Anne Rochon Ford, moderating.    

Check out the resources and listen to the podcast posted January 31, 2013 on the CWHN website

Should you take that screening test?

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Should you take that medical test that your doctor — or that ad — is telling you to take?

Medical screening tests are increasingly promoted as something that will save or add years to our lives, or at least tell us that we are sick and need treatment. Depression screening, Pap tests, cholesterol screening, and other tests are proliferating as fast as the proposed treatments – often drugs – are being developed. Seldom can we open a magazine, turn on the TV or browse the Internet now without being asked to take a test – or to request one from our doctors.

But can there be too much screening? More and more reports are emerging that too much screening can be bad for your health.

CWHN has created a primer on the issue of medical overscreening. See what people are saying about this timely topic, in Women, gender and medical screening.

Curriculum for front line workers in domestic violence, mental health, and substance use

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Making Connections: When Domestic Violence, Mental Health, and Substance Use Problems Co-Occur is a new curriculum designed to help front-line workers, who are disconnected within the broader health and social service system, to communicate with each other.

Making Connections by Robin Mason and Dr. Brenda Toner is multi-modal, accessible to all learning levels and styles. There is a text manual, a series of online modules, four dramatic scenarios in video format, and a one-day, face-to face, cross-sectoral workshop.

Find out more about Making Connections on these videos funded by ECHO (Improving Women’s Health in Ontario) and the Women’s College Hospital. 

Mistakes of the Past

Something Doesn’t Feel Right

A Line on Crisis

Past is Present

Women and obesity: What are the real issues?

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Obesity may well be one of the hottest health topics in North America today. We see and hear daily reports about ‘the war on obesity’ and ‘the obesity epidemic’.

How are women faring in this so-called “war”? And shouldn’t we be making peace - not war - with our bodies?

Find out more about in in CWHN’s primer Women, gender and obesity.

Girls Action Foundation: New infographics on sexual health and more

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Why girls? What are the issues facing girls and young women today? How are we supporting girls and young women to overcome barriers and reach their full potential? How can we support and inspire others to take action on these issues?

Girls Action is addressing these questions in their new infographics.

See them here: 

Sexual Health

Violence Prevention

Girls & the Media

Redefining Leadership

New! Inuit language sex-health word book

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Pauktuutit, the Inuit women’s health organization, has released a new sexual health resource in English and five major dialects of Inuktitut. Tukisiviit: Do You Understand  is intended to provide Inuit patients and caregivers, as well as health care professionals, plain language information in English and five major dialects of Inuktitut.

Effective communication between patients and health care providers may be challenging if not impossible where there are cultural and language barriers. Health programs and services must address language as well as cultural competency, ensuring accurate communication and understanding of information in Inuktitut as well as English. Within Inuit Nunangat, the Inuktitut language is a family of dialects that varies from region to region and sometimes from community to community. The Inuktitut language is strong and is widely used by Inuit in their homes and communities.

The Tukisiviit National Inuit Sexual Health Literacy Forum held in Happy Valley – Goose Bay in February 2012, brought together linguistic experts from all regions, sexual health content experts, community health and social service providers, AIDS service organizations, land claims organization representatives, educators, elders and youth, with focus on addressing the lack of sexual health and HIV/AIDS terminology and the unique differences of dialects in Inuit regions. Through this forum, Tukisiviit – Do You Understand? was developed.

Pauktuutit encourages Inuit and health service providers to use this glossary of terms to improve communication and understanding of sexual health terms.

Read more about it and download it from Pauktuutit’s website.

Creating cultural safety for Aboriginal people in urban health care

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Health Council of Canada recently released "Empathy, dignity, and respect: Creating cultural safety for Aboriginal people in urban health care", a report that highlights some of the reasons why many Aboriginal people are not seeking care in mainstream health care settings and describes key practices that are working towards positive change.

For more information and to read the report, please visit their website.

Read the commentary on this in the recent Canadian Medical Association Journal article, Considering Culture in Aboriginal Care.

The pregnancy decisions of women living with HIV

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Reproductive Health Matters has just published a supplement entitled The Pregnancy Decisions of Women Living with HIV

The supplement, edited by Sofia Gruskin, covers a diversity of topics, geographical areas and disciplines- with a strong focus on the experience and voices of HIV-positive women. Taken together, the range of articles aim to determine ways to work across disciplines and life experiences with the ultimate goal of ensuring that women living with HIV are at the centre of decision-making about their sexual and reproductive health and rights. Topics covered include: hormonal contraception; pregnancy, childbirth, abortion; sterilization abuses; and the use of health services.

To download for free, click here.

BCAM: Becoming a Chemical Detective

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Breast Cancer Action Montreal has launched a new project to provide a framework for recognizing the risks of environmental chemicals in our homes. While relevant for everyone, Becoming a Chemical Detective is particularly designed for potential and new parents, emphasizing risks posed during the vulnerable stages of pregnancy, infancy, early childhood and adolescence.  

Becoming a Chemical Detective aims to help you to not only recognize risks  present in your home but will also give you practical solutions and safer alternatives to help reduce exposure, including low-cost and affordable solutions. The presentation also helps people become more informed and knowledgeable consumers so that we will be empowered to take action to benefit not only ourselves, but our community and society. 

For more information or to book a presentation, please email viorica@bcam.qc.ca or call the BCAM office at (514) 483-1846.    

Also, to see recent editions of BCAM’s newsletter, visit their website.

 

New on CWHN! Unpacking the great mammography debate

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Read the latest addition to our guest columns that take on the hot issues of the day. In To the Point, Cornelia J.  Baines writes about Unpacking the great mammography debate.

Cornelia Baines was co-principle investigator and deputy director of the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, a major trial of breast screening that enlisted 90,000 women across Canada in the 80s. She is Professor Emerita at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health in Toronto.

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