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A gender guide to reproductive health publications: Producing gender-sensitive publications for health professionals

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Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs,  INFO Project, 2007 Nov. 20  Kols A

This guide is designed for the editors, writers, designers, and distribution specialists who help develop and disseminate reproductive health publications for professional audiences. Such publications cover a broad range. They include briefing papers and research summaries for policymakers, press releases and media kits for journalists, handbooks and job aids for providers, project reports and newsletters for program managers, manuals and curricula for trainers, and conference proceedings for researchers.

This guide outlines a five-step process for publications staff to follow: build organizational capacity so that staff have the awareness, skills, and supportive work environment needed to produce gender-sensitive publications; conduct a gender analysis of the audience to guide the content and distribution of each publication; produce a publication that considers gender in the choice of subject matter, language, program examples, training exercises, illustrations, design, and layout; design a dissemination strategy that makes sure a publication will reach both men and women in the audience; and monitor and evaluate the effectiveness, impact, and benefits of the publication for women and men in the audience.

Preventing violence before it occurs

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In 2006 the Victorian government in Australia identified the need to develop a whole-of-government plan to guide activity in the primary prevention of violence against women. This undertaking was made recognising that, while there was a growing momentum of support for primary prevention, it was important this was consolidated and sustained through sound evidence-informed policy, coordinated action and appropriate resource allocation.

This framework is designed to provide a sound theoretical and evidence base to support future government, community and corporate sector activity to prevent violence against women. It identifies priority strategies, settings and population targets. The publication is available online.

Engendering Epidemiology

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December 2007 - Volume 61, Supplement 2

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

“…..The aim of this work has been to construct what can be called an engendering epidemiology. Decision makers need sound scientific evidence on which to base decisions about priorities and the actions needed in order to avoid any kind of gender discrimination regarding health promotion, disease prevention and the management of ill people in the population….”

The DTCA Charter Challenge case: What are the different parties saying?

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In December 2005, CanWest MediaWorks began a Charter challenge against the federal government, claiming that the Food & Drugs Act prohibition of direct-to-consumer advertising infringes on the company’s freedom of expression. The case has been filed with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and is expected to eventually go to a higher court.

Early in 2007, Women and Health Protection (WHP), as part of a coalition of groups, was granted intervener status (party standing) in the Charter Challenge case of CanWest Mediaworks against the federal government on the issue of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA).

Cross-examinations on the case are expected to begin early in the new year (2008). The date for in-court hearings has been set at June 16, 2008. In the meantime, interested parties in defence of Health Canada and of CanWest have submitted affidavits to the court. All these affidavits, and accompanying exhibits, can be found on WHP site under DTCA: CanWest Charter Challenge.

Infant feeding experiences of women survivors of childhood sexual abuse

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From the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health

Violence against girls is a broad social problem. While there is a great deal of literature available on Childhood Sexual Abuse (CSA), most of it is related to clinical research or service provision; there is very little focus on breasts and breastfeeding in relation to the abuse experiences of women survivors of CSA.

Anthropologist Penny Van Esterik of York University and Karen Wood, Director of Tamara’s House, Services for Sexual Abuse Survivors in Saskatoon, teamed together recently to carry out participatory action research on the impact of CSA on women survivors and their breastfeeding experiences and infant feeding decisions.  The goal of the study was to find out how breastfeeding and support for breastfeeding for women survivors of CSA could flourish.  Drawing upon the literature on CSA and using key informant interviews, Van Esterik and Wood found that breastfeeding, with proper support, could offer important opportunities for healing for survivors of CSA – opportunities that are currently being missed.   Read the Information Sheet.

Poverty in Focus: Gender Equality

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International Poverty Centre -United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA)

This issue of IPC's journal Poverty in Focus presents a dozen articles summarising some of the most important recent research results and commentaries on the links between gender and poverty.

Reducing gender inequality promises significant returns; empowering women by improving their living conditions and enabling them to actively participate in the social and economic life of a country may well be the key for long-term sustainable development.   This issue is available online.

The Health of Franco-Ontarian Women

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The Health of Franco-Ontarian Women was written on behalf of the Ontario Women’s Health Network (OWHN) by Guylaine Leclerc with the support of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health. This project evolved out of the work of the OWHN Francophone Advisory Committee who identified the need for this work on the status of Franco-Ontarians’ health, and specifically the status of women’s health. This document provides a review of the literature on the health of Franco-Ontarians, identifies the gaps in the literature on women and the specific issues they face in terms of their health and access to health care and details the three major priorities that developed from the Table féministe francophone de concertation provinciale de l’Ontario study, Les Conditions de possibilité des services de santé et des services sociaux en français en Ontario : un enjeu pour les femmes. 

Assisted Reproductive Technologies: Overview and Perspective Using a Reproductive Justice Framework

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The Gender, Justice, and Human Genetics Program (G&J) of the Center for Genetics and Society has written this document to 1) provide basic background information on ART and 2) offer allies a perspective on ART using a reproductive justice framework. While G&J is concerned with the health and rights of all communities, this document is primarily intended for use within the reproductive health, rights, and justice movements and therefore focuses largely on women. This document will contribute to building a foundation from which to promote ART policies that reflect social justice and human rights values and principles.

The document is available online

Aboriginal Women's Health and Healing Research Group Gender Based Analysis, phase 2, Workshop Summary

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The development of an Aboriginal framework for gender based analysis (GBA) is a great priority for it promotes an Indigenous lens and allows for the development of programs and policies that are more inclusive, equitable and reflective of the needs of those most affected. The */Indigenous Peoples GBA on Family and Community/* (IP-GBA-FC) as named, defined and owned by the Aboriginal and Inuit women who participated in the Aboriginal Women’s Health and Healing Research Group (AWHHRG) GBA, Phase Two Workshop magnifies the Indigenous lens revealing women’s real priorities: healthy families and healthy communities.

Facilitated and summarized by Erin Wolski, the framework is now online.

Medicare: Facts, Myths, Problems, Promise

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The Canadian Health Coalition, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and the Canadian Federation of Nurses’ Unions are marking the fifth anniversary of the tabling of the Romanow Commission Report by launching a new book entitled: Medicare: Facts, Myths, Problems, Promise.

he book is based on contributions to a remarkable conference — S.O.S. Medicare 2: Looking Forward inspired by Tommy Douglas’ vision for the future of Medicare. Contributors to the book include: Shirley Douglas, Monique Begin, and Tom Kent, to Allan Blakeney, Roy Romanow, Stephen Lewis and Robert McMurtry, MD. In all, 34 leading health policy experts, economists, doctors, nurses and people representing the whole spectrum health care providers contributed to the book.  Medicare: Facts, Myths, Problems, Promise can be ordered online.

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