Search Resources (English): National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)

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Chemical exposure and plastics production: issues for women's health  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/2502NNEWH%20Lit%20Review%20-%20Chem%20Exp%20and%20Plastics%20Production.pdf

A literature review of chemical exposure and plastics production as it relates to women's health.

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Published: 2011
The significance of privatization and commercialization trends for women's health  
http://www.womenandwater.ca/pdf/NNEWH%20water%20privatization.pdf

Examines contemporary pressures to move towards the privatization and commercialization of water services and delivery in Canada and evaluates the gendered health implications for women that would flow from these choices.

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Published: 2009
Hazardous substances: plastics  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/PlasticsFAQ.pdf

Factsheet detailing the various plastics that workers may come in contact with in the auto industry, and how contact with these plastics may affect their health.

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Published: 2011
Women and Water in Canada: The significance of privatization and commercialization trends for women's health  
http://www.womenandwater.ca/pdf/NNEWH%20water%20privatization.pdf

Examines contemporary pressures to move towards the privatization and commercialization of water services and delivery in Canada and evaluates the gendered health implications for women that would flow from these choices.

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Published: August 2009
Chemical exposures of women workers in the plastics industry with particular reference to breast cancer and reproductive hazards  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/5316New%20Solutions%20Article.pdf

Explores the occupational exposures in producing plastics and health risks to workers, particularly women, who make up a large part of the workforce. Demonstrates that workers are exposed to chemicals that have been identified as mammary carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals, and that the work environment is heavily contaminated with dust and fumes. Finds that, as a consequence, plastics workers have a body burden of environmental contaminants that far exceeds that found in the general public.

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Published: 2012
Sex, gender and chemicals: factoring women into Canada’s chemical management plan  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/NNEWH_chemicals_report_for_web.pdf

With evidence from other NNEWH reports, calls on the federal government to strengthen the management of chemicals in Canada in order to prevent chronic low-dose exposures to toxic substances that may be having a wide-range of effects on the health of Canadians, and are disproportionately affecting women. Exposes the critical shortcomings of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), a federal initiative aimed at improving the degree of protection against toxic substances in Canada.

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Published: 2011
Webinar on biomonitoring: measuring the pollution in women’s bodies to build healthier communities  
http://www.cwhn.ca/en/node/42993

Presenter Sharyle Patton explores the uses of biomonitoring – the testing of one’s body for chemical exposure – and looks at how the experience of knowing one's body burden (the total amount of chemicals present in the human body at any given time) can help inform personal choice and political engagement. While the findings from biomonitoring may be devastating to some on an individual level, Patton suggests that if the information is used with sensitivity and respect for tradition, it can be quite powerful in helping groups work for change in toxic chemical policy. A storyteller, Patton illustrates her message with the experiences of women she has encountered through her work.

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Published: 2011
Women and water  
www.womenandwater.ca

A website that seeks to contribute to the dialogue around Canadian water policy through water research that affects women and their health. Women have historical and traditional ties and spiritual relationships with water. In this way, water is of central importance to health broadly-defined (i.e. not just physical health). However, often women are not specifically studied or physical effects on women are measured in relation to the health of their unborn and new babies. This website will explore the gendered risks to women in a country where access to safe water is often taken for granted.

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Published: 2010
Full circle: drugs, the environment and our health (Chapter 9 of The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy)  
http://www.womenandwater.ca/pdf/Push%20to%20Prescribe%20Ch%209.pdf

The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy discusses the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and uses the best evidence to argue for changes that better reflect women's needs in public health policy and that ensure those who are best suited to make these determinations are included in policy-making.

This chapter looks from a public health perspective at the trace amounts of pharmaceuticals and personal care products that have been detected in Canadian water, with particular attention to women’s relationship to this issue.

The Push to Prescribe, edited by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil and published by Women’s Press, is available at your local bookstore or can be ordered online at www.cspi.org.

This chapter is being made available by National Network on Environments and Women's Health. Please note that this chapter is for individual use only and distribution is prohibited.

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Published: 2009