Search Resources (English): Violence

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Saying no to abuse: strategies for safer services  
http://www.enablelink.org/health/hlth_articles.html?showhealth=1&id=1076
Illustrates with personal stories how people with disabilities may experience abuse. Abusers may include caregivers, spouses, and family members. Encourages people to educate themselves about their rights and advocate for them. Provides suggestions of services and organizations to contact for help. (See Details)
Published: 2004
Violence: a collective responsibility: proceedings of the 1994 SSFC Symposium on Violence
Provides essays that examine violence as a social issue.
Published: 1995
Aboriginal women too often the victims of racialized, sexualized violence   
http://www.cwhn.ca/node/39430

Discusses how Aboriginal women are over represented as victims of racialized, sexualized violence, and too often targeted because of their gender and their Aboriginal identity. Takes a look at the Sisters in Spirit initiative which was put in place to address the alarmingly high numbers of missing, murdered Aboriginal women in Canada.

 (See Details)
Published: Spring/Summer 2007
Violent victimization of Aboriginal women  
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/110517/dq110517b-eng.htm

A report of a study on violence to Aboriginal women in Canada, based on the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization. Found that nearly 67,000, or 13% of Aboriginal women aged 15 or older who lived in the provinces, self-reported they had been the victim of one or more violent crimes in the 12 months prior to the survey. Violent crimes measured by the GSS include sexual assault, robbery and physical assault. The proportion of Aboriginal women who reported spousal violence by a current or former spouse was about two and a half times higher than the proportion of non-Aboriginal women.

 

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Published: 2011
Mi’kmaq women and health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1993_Healthsharing_Vol_13_No_3_Fall_Winter.pdf

This article speaks to the health issues that face the Mi'kmaq people today that are directly related to the effects of colonization. Illustrates how Mi'kmaq women are reclaiming their traditional healing role. 

 

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Published: 1992