Search Resources (English): Biotechnology, National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)

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Silent measures: disability and the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol2no3EN.pdf

Draws attention to the measurements that inform health research and policy making. Questions the notion of the "ideal citizen" that underpins the Strategy, suggesting it implicitly excludes people with disabilities.

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Published: 2002
Placing values at the centre of biotechnology policy: the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy and women's health. Opening remarks  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/groups/biotech/availdocs/1-sherwin.pdf

Explains the history of the Working Group on Women, Health and the New Genetics, and the goals of the national Strategic Workshop held on February 11 and 12, 2000 at York University in Toronto, Ontario.

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Published: 2001
Biotechnology and women's health: re-defining the questions  
http://www.cwhn.ca/site/default/files/groups/biotech/availdocs/12-bos-tud.pdf

Looks at the practicalities of regulation and control of the new biotechnologies.

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Published: 2000
Risk, biotechnology and political rationality: lessons from women's accounts of breast cancer risks  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/groups/biotech/availdocs/9-robertson.pdf

Analyzes how women make sense of their personal risks for breast cancer, and how they feel about their ability to exert control over the disease, as individuals or as members of a group.

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Published: 2000
Shifting connections: a report on emerging federal policy relating to women's health, the new genetics and biotechnology  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/groups/biotech/availdocs/shiftconnect.htm

Provides a policy primer, of value to experts and novices wishing to gain insight into the range of Canadian government activities which bear on the way that biotechnologies will impact on women and their health.

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Published: 1999
The gender of genetic futures: the Canadian biotechnology strategy, women and health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/groups/biotech/availdocs/full-doc-2.pdf

Incorporates pre-circulated statements, plenary presentations and respondent commentary prepared for the workshop. Most of the Workshop materials are included in this collection.

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Published: 2001
Does gender count?: Differences in English-Canadian beliefs, attitudes and behaviours towards breast cancer and infertility: des  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/nnewh/gender-count.pdf

Aims to provide an empirical framework for statements about Canadian attitudes towards, or use of, technologies and complementary care.

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Published: 2001
Stepping into the breach: provincial funders replace federal regulators in defense of public priorities and safety  
http://www.cwhn.ca/groups/biotech/availdocs/20-bassett.pdf
Suggests that if the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy is left uncontested, provincial health services are likely to be overwhelmed by the activities of the pharmaceutical and device industries. (See Details)
Published: 2000
Genetic engineering in agriculture and health: feminist dilemmas and/or opportunities  
http://www.cwhn.ca/groups/biotech/availdocs/10-abergel.PDF
Examines agricultural biotechnology and identifies the way that the current prevalence of genetic engineering crops and foods has been hidden from Canadians. (See Details)
Published: 2000
A gender critique of forensic DNA evidence: collection, storage and applications  
http://www.cwhn.ca/groups/biotech/availdocs/22-lee.pdf
Argues that DNA forensic technologies are inserted into existing social systems, with all the problems and inequities that exist therein. Also points to the place of DNA evidence in an expansive network of state surveillance, with especially harsh consequences for members of marginalised communities. (See Details)
Published: 2000