Search Resources (English): Women's prisons

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Exemplary community programs for federally sentenced women: a literature review  
http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/prgrm/fsw/fsw27/toce-eng.shtml

Reviews literature relating to community programs available to federally sentenced women (FSW) upon release from prison. Examines resources and services across Canada and the United States and identifies exemplary programs available to FSW. Also discusses several research studies which indicate the needs and risks of female offenders and recommend effective programming strategies which promote successful reintegration. Reveals that while the needs and risks of women re-entering society are well known, programming for women remains culturally insensitive, scarce in its availability and accessibility, and formulated primarily to suit the needs of male clientele. Concludes by recommending alternatives to address this.

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Published: 1995
Healing the relationship between federally sentenced women and communities: a discussion paper  
http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/prgrm/fsw/fsw28/toce-eng.shtml

Focuses on approaches and strategies for creating a community advocacy network for federally sentenced women (FSW). Discusses the theoretical and philosophical basis for the proposed Community Advocacy model. This model promotes a federal strategy to implement a provincial community-based, pre-sentencing process to promote minimal incarceration for FSW through increased community participation. Concludes with recommendations for further planning and discussion.

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Published: 1995
Healing the relationship between federally sentenced women and communities: summary

Summarizes the full discussion paper entitled: Healing the relationship between federally sentenced women and communities. Summarizes discussion of the theoretical and philosophical basis for the proposed Community Advocacy model. This model promotes a federal strategy to implement a provincial community-based, pre-sentencing process to promote minimal incarceration for Federally Sentenced Women (FSW) through increased community participation. Concludes with recommendations for the establishment of a National Advisory Committee and resources needed to establish regional voluntary advisory networks.

Published: 1995
Creating choices: the report of the task force on federally sentenced women

Examines the correctional management of federally sentenced women from the commencement of sentence to the date of release to develop a plan which will guide and direct the process in a manner that is responsive to the unique and special needs of this group. Focuses on the voices of women prisoners and employs a women centred approach. Concludes by devising a set of principles meant to initiate institutional change. Principles include: empowerment, meaningful and responsible choices, respect and dignity, a supportive environment, and shared responsibility.

Published: 1990
The transformation of federal corrections for women

Provides a historical overview of changes in terms of regional facilities, programs, and services for federally sentenced women since 1990. Offers insight into where the system is headed, as well as statistical facts and figures, and common misconceptions about federally sentenced women.

Published: 2002
Report on self-injurious behaviour in the Kingston prison for women

Discusses a study undertaken at the Kingston Prison for Women about developing a therapeutic programme for women who self-injure. Interviews with prisoners security staff personnel about injury response, injury reduction and suicide identification reveals that self-injury may best be reduced by considering it a sign of emotional distress rather than a security issue, and by shifting the responsibility for its reduction from security to counselling personnel. Concludes with recommendations for the development of a programme to train prisoners as peer counsellors.

Published: 2003
Profile of women offenders: incarcerated and community population: March 2001

Compares incarcerated women and women who are serving the remainder of their sentence in the community by: age, marital status, race, offence committed, length of sentence, and previous terms of incarceration. Highlighted findings include: out of 866 women offenders in Canada serving a federal sentence, 355 (40.9%) are incarcerated while 511 (59.1%) are serving the remainder of their sentence in the community, over half (56.3%) of the incarcerated population are in 18-34 age group as compared to 43.9% in the community, and there is little difference with respect to marital status – the majority in both groups are single.

Published: 2001
Correctional program strategy for federally sentenced women

Guide for the development of programs in regional correctional facilities. Describes the overall correctional program strategy for Federally sentenced Women (FSW). Emphasizes that regional programs for FSW should be women-centred, reflect the social realities of women, and respond to the individual needs of each woman. Identifies 5 priniciples that must be present when creating programs and strategies for FSW; these are: empowerment, meaningful and responsible choices, respect and dignity, a supportive environment, and sharing responsiblity for FSW among all levels of corrections. Concludes by recommending regional programs that incorporate these principles.

Published: 1994
Federally sentenced women maximum security interview project: “not letting the time do you”

Examines the results of indepth interviews conducted with non-Aboriginal women in maximum security prisons in Canada. Undertaken to help identify interventions necessary to suitably address the issues and needs of maximum security women, and to facilitate the reduction of women's maximum security classification.

Published: 1999
Federally sentenced Aboriginal women in maximum security: what happened to the promises of “creating choices”?

Examines the experiences of Aboriginal women in federal maximum security prisons in Canada by conducting indepth interviews with incarcerated Aboriginal women. Aims to make the voices of these women heard and explore and critique the policies and programs that Correctional Services Canada (CSC) has in place to help reduce the security levels of Aboriginal women. Concludes by stating that CSC responsibility and obligation to incarcerated Aboriginal women has not been fulfilled, but has been remiss in respecting their ethnic, cultural and spiritual beliefs. Although CSC policy have mandated intentions to implement programs that recognize Aboriginal culture and spiritual beliefs, discrimination and racism against FSAW have been sited extensively.

Published: 1999