Search Resources (English): Environmental health, National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)

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An environmental framework for women's health  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/1618aa%20Radher-Peterson.pdf

Provides an overview of the literature linking environmental perspectives and women's health, summarizes the discussions held with groups of women whose voices and perspectives are not necessarily found in the literature, and attempts to draw out the policy and action-oriented implications of the findings.

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Published: 2000
Visible minority youth taking action for a healthy future: a guide for ethno-racial training trainers workshops
This pamphlet was developed from recommendations from a Canadian Centre for Women, Education and Development workshop. The objectives of the workshops are to familiarize participants with environmental health issues in an immigrant and visible minority context, to develop environmental health literacy, and to better integrate these issues into the participants’ lives and work. It contains suggestions to help create and lead workshops for school, community, and workplace groups interested in policy education and advocacy on environmental health and justice and primary prevention.
Training trainers workshops: an ethno-racial perspectives guide
This pamphlet was developed from information shared by the participants at a Multi-Racial Network for Environmental Justice workshop. The objectives of the workshops are to familiarize participants with environmental health issues in an environmental justice and ethno-cultural context, to develop environmental health literacy, and to better integrate these issues into the participants’ lives and work. It contains tools for training workshop trainers and outlines the need for workshops on these issues. The intent of the pamphlet is to help create and lead workshops for school, community, and workplace groups interested in policy education and advocacy on environmental health and justice and primary prevention.
Webinar on biomonitoring: measuring the pollution in women’s bodies to build healthier communities  
http://www.cwhn.ca/en/node/42993

Presenter Sharyle Patton explores the uses of biomonitoring – the testing of one’s body for chemical exposure – and looks at how the experience of knowing one's body burden (the total amount of chemicals present in the human body at any given time) can help inform personal choice and political engagement. While the findings from biomonitoring may be devastating to some on an individual level, Patton suggests that if the information is used with sensitivity and respect for tradition, it can be quite powerful in helping groups work for change in toxic chemical policy. A storyteller, Patton illustrates her message with the experiences of women she has encountered through her work.

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Published: 2011
Women and water  
www.womenandwater.ca

A website that seeks to contribute to the dialogue around Canadian water policy through water research that affects women and their health. Women have historical and traditional ties and spiritual relationships with water. In this way, water is of central importance to health broadly-defined (i.e. not just physical health). However, often women are not specifically studied or physical effects on women are measured in relation to the health of their unborn and new babies. This website will explore the gendered risks to women in a country where access to safe water is often taken for granted.

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Published: 2010
Full circle: drugs, the environment and our health (Chapter 9 of The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy)  
http://www.womenandwater.ca/pdf/Push%20to%20Prescribe%20Ch%209.pdf

The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy discusses the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and uses the best evidence to argue for changes that better reflect women's needs in public health policy and that ensure those who are best suited to make these determinations are included in policy-making.

This chapter looks from a public health perspective at the trace amounts of pharmaceuticals and personal care products that have been detected in Canadian water, with particular attention to women’s relationship to this issue.

The Push to Prescribe, edited by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil and published by Women’s Press, is available at your local bookstore or can be ordered online at www.cspi.org.

This chapter is being made available by National Network on Environments and Women's Health. Please note that this chapter is for individual use only and distribution is prohibited.

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Published: 2009
The gendered health effects of chronic low-dose exposures to chemicals in drinking water  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/1588hamm%202009.pdf

Presents the results of research examining drinking water data in five case studies spanning communities across the country. The data was examined in the context of emerging epidemiological evidence on low-dose exposures and their potential health effects during key developmental and reproductive life stages that can create “windows of vulnerability” with a distinctly gendered character. Confirms that for Canadians, the quality of your drinking water, from a long-term health perspective, depends on where you live.

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Published: 2009
Chemical exposures of women workers in the plastics industry with particular reference to breast cancer and reproductive hazards  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/5316New%20Solutions%20Article.pdf

Explores the occupational exposures in producing plastics and health risks to workers, particularly women, who make up a large part of the workforce. Demonstrates that workers are exposed to chemicals that have been identified as mammary carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals, and that the work environment is heavily contaminated with dust and fumes. Finds that, as a consequence, plastics workers have a body burden of environmental contaminants that far exceeds that found in the general public.

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Published: 2012