Search Resources (English): Gender-based analysis, British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health (BCCEWH)

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Improving conditions: integrating sex and gender into federal mental health and addictions policy  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/ImprovingConditions.pdf

Examines factors across the lifespan that demonstrate why an examination of sex differences and gender influences is crucial to any policy work in mental health and substance use.

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Published: 2006
Girls, women, substance use and addiction  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/bccewh/policyBCCEWH.pdf

Argues that current trends in women’s substance use demand a concerted, women-centred response.

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Published: 2005
Girls, women and substance use  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/bccewh/substanceUse.pdf

Summarizes the ways in which substance use and addiction differ for girls and women, and the implications of those differences for policy, research, systems and services.

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Published: 2005
"No gift: tobacco policy and Aboriginal people in Canada"  
http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/publications-resources/documents/No_Gift.pdf

This discussion paper examines issues related to tobacco control policy, taxation, and legislation as they affect Aboriginal women and men in BC, and identifies potentially differential impacts when gender differences are taken into account.

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Published: 2008
Reducing harm: a better practices review of tobacco policy and vulnerable populations   
http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/publications-resources/documents/ReducingHarm-Final%20PDF.pdf

Assesses evidence of the effectiveness of three aspects of tobacco control policy (sales restrictions, restrictions on location of smoking, and taxation and pricing), and the extent to which these tobacco control policies are gender-biased and have a differential impact on three vulnerable populations of male and female smokers.  Assesses the impact and consequences of these tobacco control policies on males and females of people living on low income, Aboriginal people, and adolescents.

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Published: 2007