Search Resources (English): Endocrine disruptors

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NNEWH Plastics workshop (video series)  
http://www.youtube.com/user/nnewh/videos

Fourteen videos documenting a workshop hosted by NNEWH in partnership with the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) in January 2012 in Windsor, Ontario. The workshop dealt with recent studies on the emerging health concerns for women workers in the auto sector, specifically plastics manufacturing and the possible elevated incidence of breast cancer and reproductive problems in women plastics workers. 

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Published: 2012
Chemical exposure and plastics production: issues for women's health  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/2502NNEWH%20Lit%20Review%20-%20Chem%20Exp%20and%20Plastics%20Production.pdf

A literature review of chemical exposure and plastics production as it relates to women's health.

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Published: 2011
Hazardous substances: plastics  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/PlasticsFAQ.pdf

Factsheet detailing the various plastics that workers may come in contact with in the auto industry, and how contact with these plastics may affect their health.

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Published: 2011
Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations with exposure to carcinogens and endocrine disruptors: A Canadian case control study  
http://www.ehjournal.net/content/11/1/87/abstract

Reports on a study seeking to contribute to a better understanding of cancer causation, particularly for work-related breast cancer. Found a statistically significant association of breast cancer risk with work in jobs classified as highly-exposed; 10 years of work in such jobs was estimated to increase breast cancer risk by 42 percent. For many specific sectors, with small numbers of women workers, there were too few people to show significant results, but for work in agriculture, metal-related manufacturing, automotive plastics, food canning operations, bars and casino work, statistically significant excesses were observed.

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Published: November 19, 2012
Endocrine disruption  
http://www.womenshealthdata.ca/category.aspx?catid=169&rt=2

Discusses how women, who are still the primary caregivers, are more exposed to common endocrine disrupting chemicals such as household cleaning products, than are men, and this exposes them to health risks.

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Our stolen future  
http://www.ourstolenfuture.org/index.htm

Website that explores the emerging science of endocrine disruption, or how some synthetic chemicals interfere with the ways that hormones work in humans and wildlife. Based on The book Our Stolen Future on endocrine disruption and the common contaminants can interfere with the natural signals controlling development of the fetus.

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Diabetes-obesity spectrum  
http://www.healthandenvironment.org/initiatives/diabetes

Examines obesity’s relationship to diabetes, and possible relationships being explored between synthetic chemicals and diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome.

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Programmed to be Fat?  
http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episode/programmed-to-be-fat.html

A documentary that tackles the possible role of synthetic chemicals in the 'obesity epidemic'. Tells the stories of three scientists whose unexpected findings led them to follow the research of a curious doctor in Scotland, baffled by her inability to lose weight. For three years she pored over existing research on environmental chemicals and finally published a key study in an alternative medicine journal. It linked endocrine-disrupting chemicals to the obesity epidemic. The scientists came across the paper while puzzling over their own research results.  None of their studies were about fat, but they had two things in common – they were all researching endocrine-disrupting chemicals, and they all ended up with unusually heavy lab animals.

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Published: 2012
Diabetes and the Environment: articles in the popular press  
http://www.diabetesandenvironment.org/home/further-reading

An array of resources on the relationship between diabetes and obesity and synthetic chemicals in our environment. 

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Cumulative impacts project  
http://www.cumulativeimpacts.org/

Collects the latest science, emerging best practices, analytical tools, and legal shifts that can reduce cumulative harm from environmental factors to our planet, our communities, and ourselves. These three scopes represent different aspects of the problem of cumulative impacts and leverage points for addressing it. They also overlap and affect each other. Together they call for new precautionary decision structures and initiatives aimed at reducing total environmental impacts.

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