Search Resources (English): Water pollution

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Drugs in our water: chronic exposure to chemicals in water supply may be harmful to health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/node/39540
Explores the issue of trace amounts of pharmaceutical drugs that can enter our drinking water from lakes, rivers, streams and groundwater. (See Details)
Published: 2003
Full circle: drugs, the environment and our health  
http://www.whp-apsf.ca/en/documents/fullCircle.html
Looks at the environmental contamination of rivers and lakes by chemical products from a public health perspective. Argues that the most health-promoting, cost-effective strategy for everyone is prevention. (See Details)
Published: 2004
Pharmaceuticals in our water: a new threat to public health?  
http://www.whp-apsf.ca/en/documents/pharmWater.html
Summarizes what is known about pharmaceutical and personal care products and their impact on water pollution. Describes what can be done to reverse the threat these products pose to the population's health and to the environment. (See Details)
Published: 2004
The gendered health effects of chronic low-dose exposures to chemicals in drinking water  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/1588hamm%202009.pdf

Presents the results of research examining drinking water data in five case studies spanning communities across the country. The data was examined in the context of emerging epidemiological evidence on low-dose exposures and their potential health effects during key developmental and reproductive life stages that can create “windows of vulnerability” with a distinctly gendered character. Confirms that for Canadians, the quality of your drinking water, from a long-term health perspective, depends on where you live.

 (See Details)
Published: 2009
Breast milk : an untold story  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1985_Healthsharing_Vol_6_No_3_Summer.pdf

This article identifies the chemical hazards of breast feeding. Advocates for women to take control of their own health. List of resources.

 (See Details)
Published: 1985
Mothers: the first environment  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1993_Healthsharing_Vol_13_No_4_Winter_Spring.pdf

This article discusses the reproductive health effects of industry resulting in toxic contaminants in the air, water, soil and food chain. Shows how communities can respond with the example of the resistance of Mowhawk women and The Akwesasne Mother's Milk Project.

 


 



 (See Details)
Published: 1993
Full circle: drugs, the environment and our health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/node/39366

Discusses "drugs in the water": trace amounts of pharmaceuticals detected in Canada's lakes, rivers, streams, and tap water (as well as other chemicals such as that from food and drug products), and the ways in which women are particularly affected by ecosystem contamination with pharmaceutical and personal care products.

 (See Details)
Published: Fall/Winter 2008/2009
Winning the war on cancer : Cancer prevention: Rachel Carson’s "imperative" need  
http://www.cwhn.ca/node/39386

A retrospective look at the forty-five years that have followed the release of Rachel Carson's book, Silent Spring, that both struck the match that lit the modern environmental movement but also provided an eloquent, compelling argument that man-made substances were driving cancer rates to alarming levels.

 (See Details)
Published: Fall/Winter 2007
Women and water  
http://www.cwhn.ca/en/node/42068

Outlines the research being done by the National Network on Environments and Women's Health (NNEWH) on women's relationship to our most essential resource.  The author looks at the NNEWH's website www.womenandwater.ca , a research initiative on women and water in Canada exploring Canadian water issues and the implications for women's health.

 (See Details)
Published: Fall/Winter 2009/2010
Women and Water in Canada: The significance of privatization and commercialization trends for women's health  
http://www.womenandwater.ca/pdf/NNEWH%20water%20privatization.pdf

Examines contemporary pressures to move towards the privatization and commercialization of water services and delivery in Canada and evaluates the gendered health implications for women that would flow from these choices.

 (See Details)
Published: August 2009